Course

Supporting Youth Who Support Veterans

Caregiving youth often sacrifice their own education, health, well-being and childhood to provide care for family members who are chronically ill, physically injured, elderly, disabled, or who suffer from mental health conditions such as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder or Traumatic Brain Injury. This course, “Supporting Youth Who Support Veterans,” acknowledges the contributions of these youth caregivers, goes into the scope of the problem, and offers some solutions.

Technical FAQs

There are at least 1.3 million caregiving youth between the ages of 8 and 18 years in the United States. While the numbers of youth who care for Veterans is unknown, we know that these “hidden heroes” exist and need more support. How do we help establish a connection amongst these youth caregivers and also connect them to resources? Course narrator, Dr. Connie Siskowski, the founder and president of the American Association of Caregiving Youth, says it begins with a shift in focus on children of caregivers and not children as caregivers. Caregiving youth often sacrifice their own education, health, well-being and childhood to provide care for family members who are chronically ill, physically injured, elderly, disabled, or who suffer from mental health conditions such as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder or Traumatic Brain Injury. This course, “Supporting Youth Who Support Veterans,” acknowledges the contributions of these youth caregivers, goes into the scope of the problem, and offers some solutions. The course is geared for parents and other adults to better advocate for youth who take care of a Veteran so that we can make these “hidden heroes” visible, keep them in school, and connected to a support system for life success.